Dominican Republic: A Leap of Faith

You can’t ask for clearer, more beautiful water than you’ll find in the Bahamas and the Turks & Caicos, but sailing into the Dominican Republic reminded us what was missing from those landscapes – greenery and mountains.

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Luperon harbor

IMG_9687Since numerous sailing web sites warned against corruption among officials, we were a bit hesitant to stop in Luperon, but recent reports had suggested they had cleaned up their act and we decided to chance it.  The adventures started immediately as we took a stricken vessel in tow at 3 am in the morning and brought them 25 miles to the entrance to Luperon harbor.

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First time we’ve ever towed anyone, but it worked out just fine.  Scott & Noi were very grateful and we were glad to be able to help another cruiser in need.

On arrival at Luperon, we found a beautiful anchorage and a small marina that welcomed us with warmth.

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Miguel and Leo make you feel at home at Puerto Blanco.

Check in was made simple by Leo who runs Marina Puerto Blanco and not one official asked for anything more than the posted fees for entry.   For our fellow cruisers, please reconsider Luperon; it is a wonderful location and perfect distance for visiting the DR’s natural wonder “Damajaqua Cascades” (27 waterfalls).   And while you are there, stay at Leo’s marina – you can’t beat the price.

Taking a leap faith became the theme of our time in the Dominican Republic.  At Damajagua Cascades, hiking up the trail to the 27th waterfall seemed simple enough and working up a sweat would be perfect for cooling off in the water. But when we saw a guide bringing a guy with what appeared to be a broken leg back down the trail via donkey, Sophie, Pete and I glanced at one other with an unspoken “what have we gotten ourselves into”.

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We realized that the mandatory helmets and lifejackets might not be mere dork fodder after all.

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A guide leads you up the trail, crisscrossing the river and finally to the top.

The path back down consists of sliding through and jumping over all 27 waterfalls, and in between slogging through the river to the next descent. At the jumps, the guide uses a very technical jump location technique where he tosses a pebble down into the pool below to show you exactly where to jump and then throws another one to show you where you will break your legs …gulp, talk about a leap of faith. Sometimes you slide down the falls on naturally smoothed grooves in the rock.  I’ve never been so happy to have on a safety helmet. I’ll confess I only did 26 of the 27 waterfalls as the highest jump from 30’ left me shaking in my water shoes.   Pete and Sophie fearlessly conquered all of the high plunges. Our GoPro was acting up so the footage is not great, but this video gives an idea of what it is like.

We also spent a few days at the kiting mecca of Cabarete, where Pete braved the kiting hordes.   Seems air traffic control is needed out there.DSC_1809

We put our well-honed local travel instincts to the test when we puzzled together 5, yes 5, forms of transportation, some more questionable then others, to get us the 150 miles from Luperon to the capital city of Santo Domingo. This hilarious adventure included riding on a motoconcho (that’s a tiny 125cc motorcycle with driver, Pete, me and our luggage),

Guagua car (car meant for 4 passengers but crammed with 7), Guagua bus (little bus with actual seats to ourselves this time, but still full), larger deluxe bus (complete with wifi and extremely violent Denzel Washington straight-to-DVD movie that the 7 year old kid across from us was soaking in like a sponge) and finally a taxi whose driver spoke worse Spanish than we do. Grand total: $25 total for us both, 6 hours of travel, views of the country side, small towns and local characters priceless; proving once again it is the journey not the destination, although Santo Domingo was full of interesting history and well worth a visit.

But perhaps the best part of all the Dominican Republic and on the top 10 places we’ve been to on Neko is Los Haities (High-tee-sis) National Park.  Los Haities is a Dominican national park located on the remote northeast coast consisting of a limestone karst plateau with conical hills, sinkholes and caverns, behind which is a large area of mangrove forest perfect for exploring by kayak or dinghy. Think Jurassic Park meets Survivor. It is only accessible by boat so tourism exists there but only for people willing to make the effort to find the small boat in the grimy city of Samana and brave the rough one-hour trip each way.

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Neko tucked into a safe spot with Los Haities all to ourselves.

Needless to say, we had the anchorage all to ourselves and spent two days winding deep into mangrove rivers with birds swooping overhead exploring the numerous caves, some complete with petroglyphs and pictographs left by the Taíno Indians who were there long before old Columbus arrived. Imagine, actual humans were there before the Europeans 😉

 

All in all, we found the DR an adventure wonderland.  It’s not the greatest sailing place in the world but it was a huge pleasure to experience this wild and wonderful land up close and personal.

 

 

 

 

 

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Turks & Caicos

It has taken us 3 seasons to finally hit the brakes a bit and put into practice the fine art of stopping to smell the roses.

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Yes, that’s us.

This may seem laughable to some who think we are already going at a snail’s pace, but some cruisers no doubt roll their eyes thinking our speed is that of a delivery captain.   But for us, we are trying to slow down and shift our approach to living this life more as it was intended.   We have the gift of time so why not really take advantage and use it.   I stopped spending most, not all but most, of my time in the new places planning for the next place.

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Enjoying some underwater time.

This is especially hard for me because I love to plan, research and examine my calendar like it is the Zapruder film.   This was put into play during our last stop in the picturesque Turks & Caicos, where we spent a month in Providenciales.

Not only did we take a last minute side trip to Haiti, we also enjoyed meeting some of the expat community and getting a small glimpse into their lives on this alluring island.

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Enjoying a fantastic Syrian dinner made by Aida at Ben’s lovely home with neighbors from across the globe.

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Celebrating Chloe’s birthday with half the island.

Best of all we had spur of the moment visitors which I honestly believe would have never happened if we’d planned in advance.   Don’t worry I still love my iCalendar, but now I am filling it in more as a diary than an advanced planner.

 

 

We ❤ NY

Just like Grandpa & Grandma Malloy and Grandpa Perica many years before, Lady Liberty greeted us as we sailed into New York Harbor.

Lady Liberty welcoming Neko.

Lady Liberty welcoming Neko.

Granted we were probably a lot more comfortable than they were and we knew what to expect when we arrived, but it was still exhilarating and made us excited to be back home. We were traveling with our pals on Pegasus, which made for great photo opportunities as we sailed down the East River.

 I ❤ NY

I ❤ NY

What immediately grabbed our attention was the almost unrecognizable skyline. Since 9/11 we’ve had to get used to the jarring absence of the twin towers but with The Freedom Tower and numerous new skyscraper shifting the city’s silhouette, it all seemed sadly unfamiliar.

Lucy back on the streets of NYC

Lucy back on the streets of NYC

This was perhaps the most dangerous trip to date for Pete, not for navigational reasons but because he knows how much I love NYC and once there, I may not have wanted to leave. We were thrilled to see old friends and family, ride subways, mix it up with the throngs of tourists, eat at some of our favorite haunts and just be a part of the machine that is the big apple.  Although we had a fabulous time I agreed to keep on our adventure and head back south to embark on season three of this crazy life at sea.

Freedom Tower

Freedom Tower

Thankfully the good old Empire State and Chrysler Buildings still stood proudly representing the old guard and we knew we were in the right place.

To see photos of City Island in the Bronx click here.

Southern Hospitality

Dateline Charleston, SC: First order of business is to clarify that even though we are back in the US and closer to our old stomping grounds, we are not done with this adventure yet. One of our original goals had been to sail back to the NY area to meet up with family and friends, and we are very excited to be doing that. But it is not the end of this journey. I think when that time comes we will just feel it and it is not here yet. So, we are taking this opportunity to visit favorite places and, perhaps more exciting, to visit parts of the US one or both of us have never seen. We may be domestic, but many places are still foreign to us.

Lovely homes line the Charleston Battery

Lovely homes line the Charleston Battery.

Another benefit is that family and friends are closer at hand for quick visits. They aren’t burdened with trying to cram their week’s vacation into our wildly unpredictable schedule. Pete’s brother Matt was first to arrive for a 4th of July/Brothers Malloy visit during our stop in Charleston, SC.

Brothers Malloy lineup

The Brothers Malloy.

Returning crewmember Chris was able to bring his whole family, giving us the chance to meet our new niece Sophia.

Pete convinced Emma they could run through the fountain without getting wet.

Pete convinced Emma they could run through the fountain without getting wet.

and....

and….

Emma learning not to trust Uncle Pete

Emma learning not to trust Uncle Pete.

We even caught back up again with fellow cruisers Rob and Rose, who we’ve sailed off and on with since Pacific Mexico.

We love seeing our boat buddies Rob and Rose  arrive to share in the fun.

Now the party can start.

We arrived in Charleston to a harbor buzzing with Coast Guard and police boats.   We later learned it was security for President Obama who was giving the eulogy for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, one of 5 church members shot to death at the Emanuel A.M.E. church.

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It was truly inspirational to see the families and the city of Charleston rising above and forgiving, persevering and seeking light from such a dark and repulsive act.

These uplifting banners were found throughout town.

These uplifting banners were found throughout town.

AME church note

AME church flowers

Hundreds of flowers line the front of the church.

AME hydrant

Charleston is dripping with charm and history and bacon fat (the food is delicious but geez have they met a dish they haven’t merged with a pig part).   Don’t get me wrong, we didn’t let that stop us and we ate and ate and ate. Hell, who doesn’t love a homemade biscuit or eating catfish for breakfast?

You know how I know I’m getting older, no not that it is harder to lose weight from all those biscuits or recover from a hangover, it is I’m going on a walking tour or taking a corny carriage ride and, gasp, enjoying it.

Carriage ride

All aboard the middle age express.

yes of course I worried about the horse.

Yes, of course I worried about the horse.

Where once I scoffed at guides leading me around with a group of other camera toting gawkers, I now find them a perfect way to get the lay of the land and god forbid learn a thing or two. Afterwards we can tackle the city on our own, seeing it at our pace and once again being too cool for guide books. Humidity be damned, we walked and walked (remember we ate a lot of biscuits) soaking in the gorgeous architecture, landscapes and everything else the low country had to offer.

Southern hospitality wasn’t just for us, Charleston is one of the dog friendliest towns we’ve been to and Lucy was welcomed almost everywhere we went.

Some of the best houses were down these alley streets

Some of the best houses were down these alley streets.

Lucy riding into town.

Lucy riding into town via the marina’s courtesy shuttle…now that is first class.

Caught red handed (or mouthed) Pete and Lucy sampling hot sauces

Caught red handed (or mouthed) Pete and Lucy sampling hot sauces.

Lucy found a new house for us.

Lucy found a new house for us.

But it’s not only about horses and dogs, we had another raccoon incident.  This little guy somehow found his way onto the our dock, and was caught by Lucy actually trying to climb up our water hose to get on the boat.  Since the dock is long and far from the shore, he was certainly not where he belonged.

Wanna be crew

Wanna be crew.

The marina called the critter catcher who scooped him up and we were sad because we know where wayward raccoons go (and not to a big farm out in the country).  But we later saw some commotion on the dock and heard that the little guy opened his cage and got out.  But not to be deterred, the critter catcher caught him again.  However, this guy was determined and once again opened his cage and escaped.  This time he scampered into the marsh and the catcher said he would not go after him a third time.  So here’s to a determined little guy.  May he live long and prosper.

He sure is cute

He sure is cute.

Note to cruisers: The Charleston City Marina was full of some of the most helpful folks we’ve met. They welcomed us and Lucy with open arms and dog biscuits. They provide a free shuttle service into town yet it is walkable if desired. If you are in the anchorage it is a quick dinghy ride to the marina’s dinghy dock.   If you do go into the marina and they assign you to the Megadock be sure to request the inside. When those summer storms roll in the boats tied to the outside were getting tossed around like corks.

Here comes the rain again

Here comes the rain again.

Mexico Part Dos

We returned to Mexico, this time to the Caribbean side for a quick stop to see our dear friend Randy at his beautiful casa in Tulum.

Randy's casa es Lucy's casa

Randy’s casa es Lucy’s casa

You know Randy has had a few too many if he isn't checking out the bikini babe on the beach.

You know Randy has had a few if he isn’t checking out the bikini babe on the beach.

Randy, Mary ,Pete in TulumTulum is on the Yucatan Peninsula along a stretch of ocean they call the “Mayan Riviera.”  It’s essentially miles and miles of all-inclusive beach resorts behind huge gated walls, kind of bland and unnatural.  Tulum is the hipsters’ answer to the Riviera Maya.  If Cancun’s frat boy-filled non-stop party or the Riviera Maya’s all inclusive mega-resorts aren’t your thing (and you know they aren’t ours) then head to Tulum for a yoga retreat, eco-chic chill out.  Even the  Mayan ruins there (the only one built on the coast) are low key and easy to navigate in a few hours, then you can cool off in one of Tulum’s many cenotes (freshwater sinkholes).

Time for a quick morning of kiting for Pete

Time for a quick morning of kiting for Pete

We also ducked into El Cid marina in Puerto Morelos for a safe haven for Neko while we did some land travel (more on that in the next post).  When we pulled into our slip I looked over and to my delight saw one of our sister ships, “Beach House”.   You have to realize there were only 13 (Neko is #12) Switch 51’s made and I’ve never seen another.  Pete is active online in the Switch owners’ group and they all “know” one another in the virtual world, so it was a kick to meet Scott and Nikki in person and check out each others’ boats.

Scott and Nikki for our sister ship "Beach House"

Scott and Nikki from our sister ship “Beach House”

Lovely beaches of Puerto Morelos, Mexico

Lovely beaches of Puerto Morelos, Mexico

Lucy enjoying digging in the sand.

Who me?  No, I wasn’t digging.

Happy to be back in the land of delicious Mexican food

Happy to be back in the land of delicious Mexican food

We headed over to Isla Mujeres to wait for our weather window and to enjoy a few last days in Mexico. Like Cabo on the Pacific side, Isla Mujeres was a bit too touristy, but the folks were friendly and for our fellow boaters the anchorage is well protected – apart from the wakes from the giant over-packed party excursion boats.  And clearing out of the country was a breeze.

Room for more

Room for more

Then after a year and a half it was time for us to head to the strangest land of all…Florida. With the help of  the Gulf Stream giving us an extra 2+ knots push we sailed along at times up to 10-12 knots, making the trip in a speedy 48 hours .  We would have loved to stay in Key West a bit longer, but only had time for a delicious fish dinner and trip to the Hemingway house before a cold front and cruise ship invasion made us zip out and up to Fort Lauderdale and a marina tie up.

polydactyl cats at the Hemingway House

polydactyl cats at the Hemingway House

Beautiful Key West

Beautiful Key West

Pete Hemingway House

Pete Hemingway House

Cruise ship

Our signal to depart

Funny, we left San Francisco under the Golden Gate Bridge and returned to the U.S. under another bridge, this time they had to open up for us to fit under.

Safely through the 17th Street Bridge.  The first of 5 bridges to get to our new home base in Fort Lauderdale for the next month.

Safely through the 17th Street Bridge. The first of 5 bridges to get to our new home base in Fort Lauderdale for the next month.

We left the U.S. under the Golden Gate Bridge and returned 1.5 years later through another.

We left the U.S. under the Golden Gate Bridge and returned 1.5 years later through another.

So after some boat repairs here in boat heaven, a.k.a Fort Lauderdale, visits with family and friends, and trips to Target we will move on to the Bahamas and then, who knows?

Seeing is Belizing

We have been to Belize twice before on charter boats: first in 2001 (when we met and adopted Lucy)

Lucy in 2001

Little Lucy in 2001

and then again in 2010.   Even though I’d love to say that Lucy recognized her homeland, I think we were more excited anthropomorphizing her nostalgic reaction than she was to return.  Honestly the best part is that she is still with us after all these years and we were able to share another great experience with our favorite hound.

Who said you can't go home again?  Looking longingly at the homeland

Who said you can’t go home again? Looking longingly at the homeland.

Belize is bordered by a barrier reef (supposedly the longest one in the northern hemisphere) which only allows entry at certain points.  These can be treacherous and often require passing with the sun clear of clouds and well overhead.  The reason for this is that where the reef is not sticking above the water, it lies only a few feet below and you can only tell it is there from the different color of the water.  In bad light, they are invisible. Charts show shipwrecks dotted along this reef virtually every few miles.  It would be real easy without modern navigation aids to trip right over it.  When Pete and Chris came over from Roatan, they slowed down and had to wait for hours outside the reef for some squalls to pass before the light was good enough for them to see the reef entrance. However, they got inside and anchored in the cute little town of Placencia, where I met back up with them after my sojourn to the Sundance Film Festival.

Tranquil restaurant is a delightful place accessible only by boat (or I guess you could swim)

Tranquil restaurant is a delightful place accessible only by boat (or I guess you could swim)

Placencia footpath

Placencia’s footpath guide you around town

Placencia waterways

Or you can use the waterways

Placencia Selfie

Placencia Selfie

On previous trips to Belize we focused on the northern part of the country so we were thrilled to explore the southern cays, mangroves and the outer atolls.

Exploring the mangroves, sadly we didn't have a manatee sighting

Exploring the mangroves, sadly we didn’t have a manatee sighting

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Swim day. Lucy has mysteriously taken to wading out and then swimming a bit without any coaxing from us. This is new behavior.

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Why, hello dare.

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Goff’s Cay. Pete was looking for the Corona and lime from the ad.

DCIM100GOPRO DCIM100GOPRO(Word of the day ATOLL – a ring-shaped coral reef or a string of closely spaced small coral islands, enclosing or nearly enclosing a shallow lagoon.  You’re welcome cross word puzzle lovers 😉  They lie outside the reef and reaching them requires passing back through the reef.  The waters all around Belize are crystal clear and very shallow.

The water was clear as gin.

The water was clear as gin.

It is a world of difference when you are on a charter boat (think rental car) zipping through the shallow waters of Belize without a second thought compared to gingerly putting along in your own boat through the shallows praying you won’t run aground.  We draw 4′ and at times we were uncomfortably close to the bottom.

It is slow going when you draw 4 feet and the depth finder reads 4.4

It is slow going when you draw 4 feet and the depth finder reads 4.4

After our rock encounter in Panama, we were at first a little gun-shy.  But the bottom is mostly sand and the few coral heads that do stick up are easy to spot.

Yes that is the bottom of Neko and yes that is the bottom of the sea.

Yes that is the bottom of Neko lying feet off the bottom.

After a few weeks of this dance, we were considering 8′ really deep water.  Back in California we would have had a fit if we strayed into 8′ deep water. The Belize atolls are delightfully remote and populated only by quirky little dive- or eco-resorts where everything is shipped in by boat.

clear water Belize

clear water Belize

Neko and Pegasus enjoying a romantic sunset

Neko and Pegasus enjoying an atoll sunset

James and Charlotte from Pegasus

James and Charlotte from Pegasus

Glover

Glover’s Reef with odd stick structures.

Pete and Lucy at Marisol Bar

Lucy never passes up a happy hour

 

Nothing better than a bar at the end of a dock

Nothing better than a bar at the end of a dock

Your room awaits you

Your room awaits you

We continued our diving adventures with our pals Charlotte and James on Pegasus at Glovers’ Reef and Turneffe Atoll.  The water in Belize is beautifully clear and full of coral and sea life.

Sea Hunt

Sea Hunt

Pete's new pal

Don’t touch that turtle!

Rollin' in the deep

Rollin’ in the deep

Mary and Peter Scuba II

I still can’t believe I’m doing this

Diving "The Crack" at Glover.  One at a time please

Diving “The Crack” at Glover.   Yes, this is the way up and out…WTF

We had a blast but a norther (strong wind from the north) was threatening and these islands do not have safe places to anchor with protection from north winds.  So we hustled back inside the barrier reef and ducked into the Cucumber Beach Marina to wait it out.  For our fellow boaters, this marina is well protected and a good place to pick up/drop off visitors at the airport.  Belize City itself is worth a look if you are there but I wouldn’t make a special trip.  But check out of the country there was fast and simple.

Belize City

Belize City

Ice cream stop

Ice cream stop

Local bus to Belize City

Local bus to Belize City

I passed on the cow foot soup

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Lighthouse named for a guy who paid for it but never set foot in Belize City

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Florida? Could be, but its Belize City.

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Belizean Venice? Not really…

 

For my Florida friends...I think there might be a trademark law suit here LOL

For my Florida friends…I think there might be a trademark law suit here LOL

From here on we were back in familiar territory and didn’t spend too much more time.  We couldn’t pass up a stop at Caye Caulker, an island with no cars, but loads of rastas, hippies and young people out exploring the world.  Its a fun stop and we spent about a week there.

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Happy to see a rescue dog program in place

Happy to see a rescue dog program in place

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Use your best island accent to figure this one out

 

Rasta bar

Rasta bar

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Eat here it is fantastic Italian!

Eat here it is fantastic Italian!

DSC_0268Then it was out another reef cut into the ocean for our return to Mexico, this time Caribbean side.

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Leave the yellow buoy to starboard (hope its where its supposed to be), turn left, don’t hit the rocks.

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Reefed down on the way up to the next stop, Mexico.

 

The Scoop on the Dups

The San Blas archipelago is one of the top cruising destinations in the Caribbean.  Lying only 70 miles east of the entrance to the Panama Canal, these 300+ islands range in size from a spit of sand with 1 perfectly arching palm tree seen by many only in beer ads to village islands with dwellings packing ever inch.

Cue the Corona commercial

Cue the Corona commercial

Of the 300+ islands, only 30 or so are inhabited, Nargana is one of them.

But mainly you see uninhabited islands surrounded by the clear Caribbean sea.   They lie off the Panama mainland which is mostly undeveloped.

Guarladup in Coco Bandero Cays is not

Guarladup in Coco Bandero Cays is not

Waisaladup

Waisaladup

Kanlildup (Green Island)

Kanlildup (Green Island)

Travel, other than by boat, into Guna Yala is an arduous dirt road jeep trip + water taxi or by small plane.

Yes, that is Neko anchored at the end of the runway

How is that for airport parking? Neko anchored at the end of the runway.

The Gunas are the indigenous folks who live in the islands and are proud of their traditional way of life and, though technically Panamanian, they have managed to live autonomously and preserve much of their culture.

Hard to see but this Guna lady is standing in her boat talking on her cell phone.  I didn't say they were Amish, a gal has gotta keep in touch.

Hard to see but this Guna lady is standing in her boat talking on her cell phone. Hey, I didn’t say they were Amish, a gal has gotta keep in touch.   Many times Guna will come by your boat asking you to charge their phones as most islands have no electricity.

The Gunas are the primary residents of these islands and have their own language and refer to the area as Guna Yala (Panamanians call it the San Blas).  Charts of the area label the islands with a bunch of hard-to-pronounce letters each ending in “dup” (pronounced doop), the Guna word for island.  Doesn’t “Ogoppiriadup” just roll off the tongue?

Guna sail or paddle their cayucos all around these islands.

Guna sail or paddle their cayucos all around these islands.

However, having once been a part of Colombia and now Panama, Spanish words pepper the area as well.  And now that the Americans, Europeans and gringos in all shapes and forms have discovered this cruiser’s paradise, they have added names of their own.   So the anchorages around Banedup, Quinquindup, Kalugirdup, Miriadup, Tiadup are referenced by clear-water loving cruisers as the ” the swimming pool” “the hot tub” and “the changing room”.

You can see why they call it the swimming pool.  Mike and Dave night swimming

You can see why they call it the swimming pool. Mike and Dave night swimming.  And if you look to the left of Mike you can see our anchor chain…now that is some clear water!

Neko & Apsaras anchored in the changing room. (thanks for the photo Rob)

Neko & Apsaras anchored in the changing room. (thanks for the photo Rob)

In addition, there is a Dog Island, a Green Island and BBQ Island.

Snorkel gang on dog island

Snorkel gang on Dog Island

Dog Island

snorkeling on a wrecked ship

snorkeling on a wrecked ship

Peter exploring the wreck

Peter exploring the wreck

Appropriately Lucy went to Perro Island

Appropriately Lucy went to Isla Perro too

The Gunas are small-statured people, with large skills in fishing and mola making.  Molas are multilayered panels of cloth cut away to achieve intricate patterns of abstract shapes or animals. Aappliqué is also used and carefully hand stitched to create the panels.

Guna women in traditional dress.  Note mola panels on the front of their shirts.   And wini beads around their legs

Guna women in traditional dress.  I got this photo online to illustrate the mola panels on the front of their shirts. And intricate wini bead design around their legs.

The molas are used as a front and back panel of women’s blouses, but the craft has become their signature and the panels are seen now by many as folk art.   While fishing, lobstering and crabbing are traditionally done by the Guna men, mola making is “women’s work”.  However, the two master, and best known, mola makers are transgender men (completely normal and accepted by the Guna), the famous and talented Lisa and Venancio.

Lisa, master mola maker comes by for a visit.

Lisa, master mola maker comes by for a visit.

Buying molas from Venancio

Buying molas from Venancio

We dined several times on local lobster and giant red crabs sold to us by enterprising Guna fisherman working from their dugout canoes. We had the pleasure of our friends Mike and Holly joining us on Neko for a few weeks of sailing these beautiful islands. Fellow boat pals Rob & Rose on “R&R Kedger”, Dave & Melissa on “Apsaras”, Dave & Margaret on “Heart and Soul” and special guest stars Roger & Susan on “Second Wind” made up our fun loving “lobster” fleet.  By the way readers, the SS Neko is now open for visitors, so let us know if you want to spend some time with us.

Peter, Mike and Dave aka the lobster executioners.

Peter, Mike and Dave aka the lobster executioners.

Mary and Holly ready to steam these babies.

Mary and Holly ready to steam these babies.

Lobster Fest 2014

Lobster Fest 2014

Red Crabs

Next up, giant red crabs for dinner. This time kindly fishermen did the dirty work of cleaning them.

Thanks to R&R, Apsaras and Second Wind for sharing photos.  Click on photos to enlarge.